Violence and police-brutality has a local organization questioning system used to monitor law enforcement

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AUGUSTA, Ga. (WJBF) – A local organization is asking how officers are monitored.

After the Ferguson shooting, leaders of Blacks against Black Crimes wanted answers about what kind of system is in place to hold deputies accountable if they break protocol.

After the Ferguson shooting, leaders of Blacks against Black Crimes wanted answers about what kind of system is in place to hold deputies accountable if they break protocol.

The President Kirby Turner told WJBF NewsChannel 6 he was worried about the increasing violence in America. That’s why last year, he set out to find out what the Richmond County Sheriff’s Office is doing to make sure deputies are doing their jobs without anger or racism.

“My concern was is there any type of monitoring of policemen? How are they being talked to? And what type of system do they have in place, in case they find something?” Turner said.

President Turner told WJBF NewsChannel 6 back when Michael Brown was shot in Ferguson, Missouri he was worried police brutality would erupt across America, “God knows I don’t want to think about it happening here with us.” He said.

Turner says he feared Ferguson was a foreshadowing of more violence to come.

In an effort to stop it from happening in the Garden City he went straight to the Richmond County Sheriff’s Office to get answers about the policies they abide by. “I was very satisfied with the things that they have in place,” Turner said. “They have [set up] with their own, a department where they do mentoring.”

According to Turner, officers are monitored continuously and those with serious problems are referred for proper treatment. Turner says he trusts the system, but he does encourage other citizens to ask the same questions to the Sheriff’s of their counties.

Newcomer to the C.S.R.A. Mark Monett lives in Columbia County and works in Richmond County. Monett says he has many questions, for both the Richmond and Columbia County Sheriff’s Office, but he’s been satisfied with what he’s seen so far. “I wasn’t here a week and I got a ticket for a seat belt,” Monett said. “So I felt good about it. They are doing their jobs.”

Still, some citizens says the recent police-involved shootings, has not changed the faith they have in their local law enforcement.

“I do trust my local sheriff’s office. Everybody has their opinions of what’s going on, but when I’ve called my 911. My police have come out and did me justice.” Sedell Brown, a resident of Columbia County said.WJBF NewsChannel 6 did reach out the Richmond County Sheriff’s Office for comment about their policies and we are waiting to hear back.The Aiken County Sheriff’s Office did provide WJBF NewsChannel 6 with information about their policies, but refused an interview.The Columbia County Sheriff’s Office told WJBF NewsChannel 6 they would be available for an interview on Tuesday, so we will be following up.

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