JENNIE: Women in medicine face unique challenges

Jennie

AUGUSTA, Ga. (WJBF)– Thank you for joining me today as we look at the changing face of medicine.

In 1921, the first woman graduated from the Medical College of Georgia. And now, a century later, women make up more than half of the freshman class at the medical school!

That’s an important shift for the workplace and the make-up of management.

Dr. Lara Stepleman is Chief of Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry and Health Behavior at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University. She was recently named the medical school’s inaugural Associate Dean for Faculty Success and Inclusive Excellence.

Stepleman says part of a woman’s ability to succeed is access to opportunity.

“For example, we find that when they’re considering people for a leadership position and they’re throwing around names, it is less likely that a woman’s name will be tossed into the pile, which is why it’s so important for her to have connections to people who are in leadership- who tend to be less women-dominated, to insure there’s someone out there to say ‘Hey, I know this great woman who would be perfect for this position.”

One of Stepleman’s workshops is about career ownership. She says no one is going to advocate on your behalf, and women especially need to be proactive about their skill sets and what they bring to the table.

She is especially proud of the voice women have in leadership at her institution, crediting its above average statistics to Dr. David Hess, Dean of the Medical College of Georgia.

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