Masters traditions take flight

CSRA News

“I come out here about every year for the last 5 years,” Clarence Stidons Jr. 

“It’s the first time for me. I came out with a friend of mine who told me that this was a tradition to come out and see the planes taking off,” says Jeff Lovette. 

One of the Masters traditions for locals is watching airplanes come in and take off outside of the Augusta Regional Airport. Many people park their cars down the barbwire fence on Lock and Dam Road to watch the show take flight. 

“It’s the new normal for Augusta. Whenever you’re at the Masters and you ain’t got nothing to do, just come out and watch the airplanes.” Says Joanna Glenn. 

April brings in many Masters patrons and golfers– which gives the airport one of its busiest weeks. 

The best part of this experience to locals is simple.

“I just wanted to watch the planes when they take off for the masters,” Cohen Jaksch.

Some are in awe of the planes itself that attracts people. 

“You can imagine the weight of the something that’s so strong that can go up to the air or come down…and not to mention the people that are on them. So they get to see Augusta, Georgia or if they’re from Augusta, so hey! It’s the best place to come,” says Joanna Glenn. 

Either rain or shine today with the Masters concluding, people are still making sure they are keeping this tradition alive. They’re outside of this barbwire fence watching planes come in and out. Some have been here for hours, thirty minutes, and some just stopping by, but they weren’t going to let the rain stop them. 

“I don’t care if it’s raining or not, I’m still coming! Brave the weather and try it. This is the best feeling to watch the airplanes,” says Joanna. 

Although the masters is an exclusive event, some are listening to the Masters updates on their car radios and also the roar of the planes. 

 

“I’ve been listening to Tiger. He’s 12 under right now at about 11:50am, so I hope he can go ahead and win it,” says Clarence. 

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